1 year ago#1
Guest
Guest

what is the value of 20 dollar gold coin copy from history channel sent 10- 10 10 is a 1854 liberty copy double eagle . is it a real gold coin copy or gold plated

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1 year ago#2
PassionForHistory
Fresh Member
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Hello Guest,

The question you ask borders on the line of a historical topic, although the coin itself is a piece of history. You should probably have put this question to a coin forum.

Actual Gold Double Eagle coins, which are about 90% gold/10% copper are in the $800+ price range. This is primarily based upon the actual weight in gold of the piece, so if the coin is gold (I don't think they can make exact copies of a historical coin) then you should expect its price range to be similar.

If the price is very low, you can probably assume that the coins are copies made of yellow bronze, or a combination of brass, copper, and tin, which seeks to copy the tone of gold, but is actually almost too bright. Gold coins are not usually real bright since solid gold is too malleable. Adding copper makes the coin more rigid and gives it a slightly redder appearance.

There was a similar experience on the American frontier with a metal called “Nickel Silver”. The traders were selling silver ornaments to the Natives, articles that maintained a long life and remained bright. Suddenly "nickel silver" appeared, which is actually made without any silver at all, and the objects started to tarnish quickly, having a bluish residue (nickel). They were slightly cheaper priced than the actual silver articles (and the traders made much greater profits), but were not the same metal, even though they looked like it when they were freshly polished.

I suggest you watch this video for additional information on the actual Double Eagles; http://coinstv.com/liberty-head-double-eagle/

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1 year ago#3
robert
Guest

yes, i have a gold coin that is a twenty d, and 1854 on it but above the stars it says copy on it i am trying to get a price range on it, thanks robert

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1 year ago#4
jade
Gold Member
Blogs: 1
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I believe you can check for current gold prices on the web but most important if this is a copy, get it checked to see if there's any real gold in it.

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1 year ago#5
GEORGE
Guest

THEY ARE MADE OF BRASS WITH A THIN COATING OF GOLD PLATE
TO TEST IF GENUINE WEIGH IT IT SHOULD BE
EXACTLY I TROY OUNCE IF NOT USE A RUB SYONE AND PUT 1 DROP OF NITRIC ACID ON THE STONE WHERE YOU RUBED THE COIN ,IF IT BUBBLES GREEN AND DISOLVES THE TRACE GOLD IT IS FAKE.
IF THAT IS THE CASE MAKE INTO A PAPER WEIGHT BY ENCASEING IN ACRILIC
IF THEY CAME FROM THE USA IT WILL HAVE COPY STAMPED ON IT BY US LAW. CAVEAT EMPTOR [LET THE BUYER BEWARE ]

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1 year ago#6
Quinn Norris
Guest

So how much would the copy be worth cause mine dies in fact have the copy sign right on the belly of the eagle

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1 year ago#7
jade
Gold Member
Blogs: 1
Forum: 243
Votes: 1

I won't be surprised if it is much less than the coin's face value.

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7 months ago#8
James
Guest

I have some $20 dollar gold coin copies. I bought them sometime in the 90's. They are like new. What is the value?

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7 months ago#9
melissa
Guest

Mine says copy on back

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7 months ago#10
GEORGE
Guest

COPY= FAKE = NO VALUE EXCEPT THAT OF THE COPPER OR BRASS THEY ARE MADE OF

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7 months ago#11
jade
Gold Member
Blogs: 1
Forum: 243
Votes: 1

George, being rude would get you nowhere on our forum.

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2 months ago#12
Alex
Guest

The copy gold coins are worth between $25 and $30. The are made made of brass and just gold plated.

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2 weeks ago#13
elfego Hernandez
Guest

I haven't 20 dollars gold coins copy and also two Buffalo niklet with India heat une haven't tree. Leg's and the other 4 also have like 20 wheet panny 1924 ! 1936. 1944 1936 1943 and more and 25 cent quarter gold I just wondering if coast any money.

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